Teaching the Game (Volume 2)

by: Richard E. FerdigEmily BaumgartnerEnrico Gandolfi

The goal of this book was to collect interdisciplinary syllabi of courses that implement, utilize, and/or teach the development or analyses of games. Chapters include a catalog description, course purposes and objectives, context, pedagogy, assignments, assessment, an expanded course outline, and a set of best practices for instruction. Readers will be able to develop or adapt their own syllabi drawing on the expertise of international leaders in gaming.  

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Book Details

Pages

596

Cover Design

Ocreations

Language(s)

English

Release Date

July 1, 2021

Product Dimensions

8.5×11

Imprint

ETC Press

DOI

10.1184/R1/14867193

ISBN

978-1-304-14915-2

The goal of this edited book is to bring together gaming faculty and course developers to present and talk about their syllabi. There are three objectives for such a goal. First, anyone interested in teaching a gaming course will be able to browse this edited volume to find course ideas. Second, we believe in the value of teaching with and through games. Rather than seeing this as a competition, we believe that the more courses that are created, the stronger the field. This book will allow for strengthening of all gaming courses. Stronger courses will lead to bigger programs and more graduates to positively influence our field. Third, our field is changing. A collection of game syllabi will allow scholars to look across multiple contexts and disciplines to understand how gaming is perceived and taught. 

In this edited volume, readers will be able to hear from successful instructors while they also see detailed course outlines (by week or module) that help them craft better gaming courses. More specifically, they will be able to explore multiple aspects of course syllabi including: the catalog description, course purposes and objectives, context, pedagogy, assignments, assessment, an expanded course outline, a set of best practices for instruction, and authors’ descriptions of potential future changes to make the course stronger.