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Analog Game Studies: Volume II
Evan Torner, Emma Leigh Waldron, Aaron Trammell, et al. 2017

Analog Game Studies is a bi-monthy journal for the research and critique of analog games. We define analog games broadly and include work on tabletop and live-action role-playing games, board games, card games, pervasive games, game-like performances, carnival games, experimental games, and more. Analog Game Studies was founded to reserve a space for scholarship on analog games in the wider field of game studies.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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Creative Chaos
Learning Lessons on Inclusion & Innovation | Making the Magic
Drew Davidson et al. 2016

Creative Chaos describes the dynamic process of collaborative design and development within interdisciplinary teams as they work to create something together. Creativity is wonderfully complex and chaotic, and at Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center we often describe what we do as “creative chaos” in that it’s not necessarily a process within which you ever have complete control.

To articulate what this means, this short book provides an overview of the ETC and our research on how diversity, inclusion and innovation are related, and also how we support these three associated ideas through our project-based curriculum. We then extrapolate from this to share some applicable best practices from the lessons we’ve been learning about the creative process and how best to support diverse teams and help them make the most of the creative chaos.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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Teacher Pioneers
Caroline C. Williams et al. 2016

Teachers are collaborators.

Teachers work with students, parents, administrators, coaches, camp counselors, education researchers, postsecondary institutions, teachers of other grades and other subjects—in short, teachers accomplish their daily miracles through collaboration by asking questions about what they don’t know and sharing what they do.

Teachers are designers.

Teachers look around their classrooms, their forests, their towns, and think, How can I make this better? How can my learners be successful today, tomorrow, next semester, next year? How can my learners change the world?

Teachers are scholars.

Teachers are constantly evaluating their classrooms, their learners, their activities, and—hardest of all—themselves. They are scientists, researchers, learners, and coaches, balancing the needs and desires of every role at the very moment of choice and enactment.

Teachers are pioneers.

And sometimes when teachers ask questions and look around at their world, they find out that there are no answers. Yet. And they go to the very very very edge of what is known, and think, What should I do next?

This book was written by teacher pioneers to share their collaborating, their designing, and their exploring.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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A Reader in Themed and Immersive Spaces
Scott A. Lukas et al. 2016

Since the late 2000s, the themed space has been the subject of widespread analysis and criticism in academic communities as well as a popular source of entertainment for people around the world. Themed spaces have, at their foundation, an overarching narrative, symbolic complex, or story that drives the overall context of their spaces. Theming, in some very unique ways, has expanded beyond previous stereotypes and oversimplifications of culture and place to now consider new and often controversial topics, themes, and storylines. At the same time, immersion—or the idea that a space and its multiple architectural, material, performative, and technological approaches may wrap up or envelop a guest within that space—has expanded to become an overarching concern of many consumer spaces around the world. Casinos, theme parks, lifestyle stores, and museums and interpretive centers alike have looked to immersion as a means of both selling products and educating the masses. This collection in themed and immersive spaces brings together researchers, critics, and design professionals from around the world to consider the many cultural, political, historical, aesthetic, existential, and design contexts of themed and immersive spaces. The text is organized in these key areas: the Past, History, and Nostalgia; the Constructs of Culture and Nature; the Ways of Design, Architecture, Technology, and Material Form; the Aspects of Immersion, Experience, and Phenomena; the Notions of Identity, Self, and Ideology; the Deployments of Rhetoric, Performance, and Affect; the Politics of the Space; the View of the Critic; and the Place of the Future.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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Wikipedia Knows Nothing
Chris Bateman 2016

What does the Wikipedia know, and how can it know it? More to the point, how can anyone using an anonymously edited source, the contents of which change on a daily basis, know that what they are reading constitutes knowledge? In this provocative challenge to contemporary concepts of objectivity, four figures of knowledge – the Wikipedia, scientific experiments, anonymous peer review, and school education – are investigated in order to question the way we understand the world around us.
Rather than support the classical view of an objective world 'out there' that our beliefs must accord with in order to count as knowledge, Wikipedia Knows Nothing argues that all facts are the residue of skilled activities and that knowledge is better understood as a practice. Furthermore, rather than a single 'real world', the many worlds that we each live within form a multiverse about which our subjective knowledge-practices give us broader understandings than the objective knowledge produced by experimental apparatus.
The merit of the sciences doesn't lie in their possessing the only path to truth, but in their capacity to develop knowledge-practices that can resist objections across all worlds. This leads to an urgent need to recognise the role of practices in creating and maintaining knowledge, and the different ways that truth can be stitched together into distinct but non-contradictory patchworks of 'real worlds'. When we do, we must question any claim that knowledge can come from anonymous individuals exercising an unchecked power to silence others – whether this happens on the internet in wikis, or in professional academic discourse.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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Diversifying Barbie and Mortal Kombat: Intersectional Perspectives and Inclusive Designs in Gaming
Yasmin B. Kafai, Gabriela T. Richard, Brendesha M. Tynes, et al. 2016

In Diversifying Barbie and Mortal Kombat, the third edited volume in the series that includes From Barbie to Mortal Kombat and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat, we expand the discussions on gender, race, and sexuality in gaming. We include intersectional perspectives on the experiences of diverse players, non-players and designers and promote inclusive designs for broadening access and participation in gaming, design and development. Contributors from media studies, gender studies, game studies, educational design, learning sciences, computer science, and game development examine  who plays, how they play, where and what they play, why they play (or choose not to play), and with whom they play. This volume further explores how we can diversify access, participation and design for more inclusive play and learning.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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Analog Game Studies: Volume I
Aaron Trammell, Evan Torner, Emma Leigh Waldron, et al. 2016

Analog Game Studies is a bi-monthy journal for the research and critique of analog games. We define analog games broadly and include work on tabletop and live-action role-playing games, board games, card games, pervasive games, game-like performances, carnival games, experimental games, and more. Analog Game Studies was founded to reserve a space for scholarship on analog games in the wider field of game studies.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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