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Dungeons & Dreamers
A Story of How Computer Games Created a Global Community (2nd Edition)
Brad King and John Borland 2014

In 1974, Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson published the tabletop game Dungeons & Dragons, a fantasy role-playing game. Through the next 40 years, computer game developers used these fantasy worlds as archetypes for the budding virtual game worlds These games would become as varied as books in a library, but the essence of each was built upon community. People gathered and played...together. Dungeons & Dreamers: A story of how computer games created a global community follows the designers, developers, and players who built the virtual games and communities that define today's digital entertainment landscape and explores the nature of what it means to live and thrive in virtual communities.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

Purchase from AMAZON and in any digital format from SMASHWORDS
(Use the coupon code DG23F and pay only $2.00).

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Nonverbal Communication in Virtual Worlds
Joshua Tanenbaum, Magy Seif El-Nasr, Michael Nixon et al. 2014

Over the last 20 years there has been an expansion of network mediated social activities, and an accompanying explosion of research interest into the poetics of networked communication. Of particular interest is the rise of what have come to be known as “virtual worlds”: persistent graphical environments populated (and often partially authored) by large communities of individual users. Interactors in these worlds are embodied as avatars: digital puppets or representations through which the user exerts his or her will on the environment. It is this virtual embodiment that makes today’s virtual worlds so interesting. With virtual embodiment comes a host of new and important communicative possibilities, and an assortment of new challenges and literacies including a wide range of nonverbal communication behaviors and non-linguistic social signaling options.

In this book, we begin the work of articulating the challenges and possibilities for non-verbal communication in virtual worlds. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, we consider the past, present, and future of human communication online.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License

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A Playful Path
Bernard De Koven 2014

A Playful Path, the new book by games guru and fun theorist Bernard De Koven, serves as a collection of ideas and tools to help us bring our playfulness back into the open. When we find ourselves forgetting the life of the game or the game of life, the joy of form or the content, the play of brain or mind, body or spirit, this book can help us return to that which our soul is heir.

"A playful path is the shortest road to happiness." ­‐ the Oaqui

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Charm Bracelet Project
Children's Museum of Pittsburgh 2013

Charm Bracelet Project: Culture and Community on Pittsburgh’s North Side tells the story of cultural, educational and recreational organizations transforming traditional understandings of how institutions make community impact.  This publication offers a portfolio of projects as well as descriptions and insights that showcase how a network of organizations worked collectively to foster vibrancy at the street level and constructively impacted Pittsburgh’s North Side, a corner of the city faced with substantial challenges. 
 
Despite being ravaged by ill-founded urban renewal strategies of the 1960s and the collapse of industry in the 1970s and 1980s, Pittsburgh’s North Side boasts many of the city’s cultural assets.  The institutions are separated not terrifically by space but significantly by a long history of independent operation.  But an ambitious expansion of the Children’s Museum in 2004 that required significant community engagement signaled a change. 
               
The ensuing partnerships and collaborations launched an intentional practice of sharing agendas and joining agendas by and between the ‘charms’ of the North Side. In 2006 the Children’s Museum sponsored a design competition funded by the National Endowment for the Arts that challenged local institutions, neighborhood residents, artists, designers, and philanthropy to “… identify potential strategies or approaches for connectivity” - and create a ‘bracelet’ on the North Side to strengthen family experiences, guide future development and invigorate the everyday spaces of a city. 

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Entertainment Engineering
John W. Wesner 2013

"Entertainment Engineering." You may ask, "what has Engineering to do with Entertainment, other than the design of roller coasters?" The reality is that engineering lies behind almost every type of entertainment, from the press that printed this book, through special effects in many movies, to the creation of "rides" based upon flight simulators and industrial robots.

Entertainment has more influence on popular culture than almost anything you can name. In this book we begin in Part 1 by looking at the entertainment industry in general, with a focus on delighting the customers. We ask what is unique/special about the domain Entertainment, we look at the broad scope of Entertainment, and end by asking the reader to think about their own entertainment preferences. In Part 2 we examine exactly how the behind-the-scenes engineering contributes to many specific types of entertainment.

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Preparing Teachers to Teach Writing Using Technology
Kristine E. Pytash, Richard E. Ferdig, Timothy V. Rasinski, et al. 2013

Technology is changing not only how people write, but also how they learn to write. These profound changes require teachers to reconsider their pedagogical practices in the teaching of writing. This books shares instructional approaches from experienced teacher educators in the areas of writing, teacher education, and technology. Chapters explore teachers personal experiences with writing and writing instruction, effective pedagogical practices in methods writing courses, and professional development opportunities that effectively integrate technology into the writing classroom and contribute to students’ growth as writers and users of technology. While the chapters in this collection are written to inform practice, they are written from a theoretical and empirical base by research-oriented educators in our field. Each chapter provides a research base for a particular instructional approach, a description of their strategy, and examples from instructional settings that highlight how the pedagogical practice advanced the knowledge of the teachers in the areas of writing instruction and technology. This collected volume provides as up-to-date understanding of how teachers are prepared to teach writing using technology.

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